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EXHIBITIONS


Western Regionalism: Kim Wiggins & William Haskell
Opening Friday, July 4, 5-7:30pm at 123 W Palace Ave

 

Manitou Galleries is pleased to present Western Regionalism, a show featuring the works of Kim Wiggins and William Haskell. John O'Hern writes about the artists, "Haskell’s and Wiggins’ landscapes tell the story of the people who once lived in the region and embody the essence of the landscape and the life that was here before them and will be here long after they’re gone."
Kim Wiggins’ dramatic expressionist oil paintings of his native New Mexico are populated with ribbons of color, bulbous clouds, anthropomorphic mountains and sinewy trees. Concerned foremost with composition, Wiggins carefully plans out the placement and elements to each painting and depicts the spiritual essence of his subject.
Laurie J. Rufe, former Director of the Tucson Museum of Art states, “Like Van Gogh, Wiggins' style is based on a pictorial language of heavily impastoed brushwork, bold color, and dynamic surface movement. Wiggins draws upon Post-Impressionism, Expressionism, American Regionalism, and muralist and folk art traditions, and it is this union that makes his paintings truly unique and unexpected.” 
Nestled in a high desert terrain, the villages of Northern New Mexico inspire artist William Haskell to create exquisite watercolors which reflect his passion for this unique and diversified landscape. Weathered adobe structures are drenched in a crisp white light beneath New Mexico mountain ranges in many of Haskell’s colorful watercolors. His focus on detail in his work goes beyond mere description of subject and draws the viewer into the painting for a more intimate connection with everyday forms and a sense of place. 
Working primarily in watercolor, Haskell has become known for the depth and quality of his glazes. He says, "With the use of dry brush techniques, I am able to take the watercolor to a different level by working as translucently or opaquely as needed. I use 300-pound Arches watercolor paper with a smooth, hot press finish. I seal, dry-mount and archivally varnish the finished painting. This removes the need for glass, which traditionally protects a watercolor. This allows the user to get closer to the work."

Manitou Galleries is pleased to present Western Regionalism, a show featuring the works of Kim Wiggins and William Haskell. John O'Hern writes about the artists, "Haskell’s and Wiggins’ landscapes tell the story of the people who once lived in the region and embody the essence of the landscape and the life that was here before them and will be here long after they’re gone."


Kim Wiggins’ dramatic expressionist oil paintings of his native New Mexico are populated with ribbons of color, bulbous clouds,anthropomorphic mountains and sinewy trees. Concerned foremost with composition, Wiggins carefully plans out the placement and elements to each painting and depicts the spiritual essence of his subject.


Laurie J. Rufe, former Director of the Tucson Museum of Art states, “Like Van Gogh, Wiggins' style is based on a pictorial language of heavily impastoed brushwork, bold color, and dynamic surface movement. Wiggins draws upon Post-Impressionism, Expressionism, American Regionalism, and muralist and folk art traditions, and it is this union that makes his paintings truly unique and unexpected.” 


Nestled in a high desert terrain, the villages of Northern New Mexico inspire artist William Haskell to create exquisite watercolors which reflect his passion for this unique and diversified landscape. Weathered adobe structures are drenched in a crisp white light beneath New Mexico mountain ranges in many of Haskell’s colorful watercolors. His focus on detail in his work goes beyond mere description of subject and draws the viewer into the painting for a more intimate connection with everyday forms and a sense of place. 


Working primarily in watercolor, Haskell has become known for the depth and quality of his glazes. He says, "With the use of dry brush techniques, I am able to take the watercolor to a different level by working as translucently or opaquely as needed. I use 300-pound Arches watercolor paper with a smooth, hot press finish. I seal, dry-mount and archivally varnish the finished painting. This removes the need for glass, which traditionally protects a watercolor. This allows the user to get closer to the work."




New Works by Jeff Cochran
Opening Friday, July 25, 5-730 at 225 Canyon Rd

 

Manitou Galleries is proud to present New Works by Jeff Cochran at 225 Canyon Road.
Jeff Cochran brings a more modern sensibility to the Taos landscape with scenes of tranquil fields and mountains. Cochran is also well-known for his whimsical portraits of chimpanzees.
Cochran grew up in a small town in Indiana and won an art scholarship to attend college. He began is art career as an illustrator for the Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, and by the age of 20 he sold his first painting.
Jeff has a house and studio in Taos, New Mexico, along with 5 acres of organic gardens. In winter, he spends his time in “a funky little tin-roof cabin in Costa Rica that is fairly close to the ocean.”
Much of Cochran’s early success and renown came from his large paintings of Chimpanzees. “I started painting them in college and right away I could see that people liked them and connected with them – they’re almost self-portraits of some sort. It’s a fun mental game too, because it’s like the chimps are human without being human, and I think that makes it easier for viewers to put themselves in the painting when it is a chimp than if it were a portrait of just some non-descript human.” Cochran’s dinner with Jane Goodall came about when he found out that the Jane Goodall Institute’s annual fundraiser. Uninvited, he sent them a four-foot chimp painting. Goodall loved the painting so much that she didn’t want to auction it off but wanted to hang it in her office. So Cochran sent a second painting to donate to the auction, and later attended Goodall’s 70th birthday party.
In addition to painting, Cochran is an organic farmer, selling vegetables at farmer’s markets, as well as opening his farm to young people interested in gardening and farming. Cochran thinks of his farming as art, and that what he is really doing is creating a giant land sculpture. “The different colors of plants and soil and mulch contrasting with furrows and beds are like a three dimensional painting.”

 

Manitou Galleries is proud to present New Works by Jeff Cochran at 225 Canyon Road.


Jeff Cochran brings a more modern sensibility to the Taos landscape with scenes of tranquil fields and mountains. Cochran is also well-known for his whimsical portraits of chimpanzees.


Cochran grew up in a small town in Indiana and won an art scholarship to attend college. He began is art career as an illustrator for the Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, and by the age of 20 he sold his first painting.


Jeff has a house and studio in Taos, New Mexico, along with 5 acres of organic gardens. In winter, he spends his time in “a funky little tin-roof cabin in Costa Rica that is fairly close to the ocean.”


Much of Cochran’s early success and renown came from his large paintings of Chimpanzees. “I started painting them in college and right away I could see that people liked them and connected with them – they’re almost self-portraits of some sort. It’s a fun mental game too, because it’s like the chimps are human without being human, and I think that makes it easier for viewers to put themselves in the painting when it is a chimp than if it were a portrait of just some non-descript human.” Cochran’s dinner with Jane Goodall came about when he found out that the Jane Goodall Institute’s annual fundraiser. Uninvited, he sent them a four-foot chimp painting. Goodall loved the painting so much that she didn’t want to auction it off but wanted to hang it in her office. So Cochran sent a second painting to donate to the auction, and later attended Goodall’s 70th birthday party.

 

In addition to painting, Cochran is an organic farmer, selling vegetables at farmer’s markets, as well as opening his farm to young people interested in gardening and farming. Cochran thinks of his farming as art, and that what he is really doing is creating a giant land sculpture. “The different colors of plants and soil and mulch contrasting with furrows and beds are like a three dimensional painting.”




Gregg Albracht: Featured Artist of the Month
July Artist of the Month at 225 Canyon Road

Manitou Galleries at 225 Canyon Road will be presenting Gregg Albracht as the featured artist for the month of July. Utilizing soft focus and slow shutter speeds, Gregg's new body of work captures the movement and motion of the equine figure. 
The artist states, "My life's passion started in the summer of 1969 when I had the opportunity to see a portfolio of fine art photographs. In a brief moment I was mezmorized by their richness and beauty...it was in that moment that photography took a hold of me and I discovered what was to become my life's work. To experience a magical moment when everything is just a perfect rare thing, but when it happens, to be there to capture it, experience it...to hold that moment forever in a photograph is what drives my life. Even today, over 40 years later, there is nothing I'd rather do than grab the cameras, get in the car, and go out and take photographs. My passion for photography is stronger than ever. Although I'd rather be in a field of horses than a room full of people, one of the greatest parts of being a photographer is sharing my love of the creative moment with others." 

Manitou Galleries at 225 Canyon Road will be presenting Gregg Albracht as the featured artist for the month of July. Utilizing soft focus and slow shutter speeds, Gregg's new body of work captures the movement and motion of the equine figure. 

 

The artist states, "My life's passion started in the summer of 1969 when I had the opportunity to see a portfolio of fine art photographs. In a brief moment I was mezmorized by their richness and beauty...it was in that moment that photography took a hold of me and I discovered what was to become my life's work. To experience a magical moment when everything is just a perfect rare thing, but when it happens, to be there to capture it, experience it...to hold that moment forever in a photograph is what drives my life. Even today, over 40 years later, there is nothing I'd rather do than grab the cameras, get in the car, and go out and take photographs. My passion for photography is stronger than ever. Although I'd rather be in a field of horses than a room full of people, one of the greatest parts of being a photographer is sharing my love of the creative moment with others." 




The Raven & the Journey: Jim Eppler & B.C. Nowlin
Opening Friday, August 1, 5:00 - 7:30 at 123 W. Palace Ave.

Manitou Galleries is proud to present The Raven & The Journey with new works from Jim Eppler & B.C. Nowlin.

 

In many Native traditions, the raven is a symbol of change and metamorphosis. Jim Eppler, who presents this concept in literal fashion, is widely known for his realistic raven sculptures. B.C. Nowlin's autumnal canvases portray horseback riders, always facing away, entering into a mysterious journey from which comes transformation. These two artists' works take "the only constant", and bring us beauty.

 

Jim Eppler has been praised for his lifelike recreations and gentle interpretations of animals. It is Eppler’s respect and appreciation for nature that allows his art to flow so freely though his bronze sculpture.

 

As accomplished as Eppler is in wildlife art, he does not limit himself to that realm. He is an accomplished portrait artist and skilled musician who is able to meld his gift for song and portraiture by creating commissioned portraits for the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame. He has created commissioned pieces for MCA Records, Mercury Records, Chappell Music, the National Wild Turkey Federation, and numerous private collectors. 

 

B.C. Nowlin’s art mirrors his cross-cultural background. A native of Alameda, New Mexico, his family’s land formed the southern boundary of the Sandia Pueblo Reservation. Nowlin came of age steeped in childhood experiences of vibrant Hispanic culture and Native Puebloan mysticism.

 

Entirely self-taught, using neither photos or sketches, Nowlin has created a visual catalog of spiritual journeys that have become his signature imagery. His palette reflects a stunning array of styles, a complex originality, and a surprising breadth of imagery that has attracted exhibitions in galleries and corporate collections worldwide.

 

The opening reception is occuring in conjunction with the West Palace Arts District’s First Friday Art Walk.  Manitou will host Mariachi Porvenir on our patio. The show will be on view through August 15th.



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Santa Fe, NM 87501
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