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Planes, Trains, & Automobiles featuring B.C. Nowlin
Opening Friday, April 25, 5-730 at 225 Canyon Rd

Manitou Galleries at 225 Canyon Road is pleased to announce our transportation-themed show featuring works by B.C. Nowlin. Also on view are works by William Haskell, Tom Perkinson, Billy Schenck, Z.Z. Wei, and Dennis Ziemienski.
While this body of work may surprise those familiar with B.C.'s painting, Nowlin's penchant for bold colorful statements remains true. In these paintings, landscapes become cinematic and surreal. Burning tractor-trailer trucks punctuate the scene as a question mark, leaving to the viewer the content of the question.
In the artists' own words: "I began this suite of artworks in 2004 by painting a burning truckload of art. Uniquely American to steer landscape tradition from the freeway onto twisting, unmarked new paths... rebellious, out of control, and exquisitely beautiful to me.
I was kicked out of art class at 17 for 'populating' every image I created, even still lifes. I've educated myself as a painter from that time until now, following an interior compass that is more image than dialogue. My artwork may be narrative; but a narrative from a book I have yet to read. I am comfortable with mystery; with my art work running years beyond my ability to 'understand' it.
In 2004 I drifted onto a secret, different path, a primal, wondering course for which no maps exists, a journey toward realities disturbing and thrilling as dreams.
Edward Hopper once said all he really wanted to do was paint light on the side of a house. Sometimes I wonder if all I want to do is paint the glowing curl of noxious green smoke against a transcendent apricot sky. Beautiful."

Manitou Galleries at 225 Canyon Road is pleased to announce our transportation-themed show featuring works by B.C. Nowlin. Also on view are works by William Haskell, Tom Perkinson, Billy Schenck, Z.Z. Wei, and Dennis Ziemienski.


While this body of work may surprise those familiar with B.C.'s painting, Nowlin's penchant for bold colorful statements remains true. In these paintings, landscapes become cinematic and surreal. Burning tractor-trailer trucks punctuate the scene as a question mark, leaving to the viewer the content of the question.


In the artists' own words: "I began this suite of artworks in 2004 by painting a burning truckload of art. Uniquely American to steer landscape tradition from the freeway onto twisting, unmarked new paths... rebellious, out of control, and exquisitely beautiful to me.
I was kicked out of art class at 17 for 'populating' every image I created, even still lifes. I've educated myself as a painter from that time until now, following an interior compass that is more image than dialogue. My artwork may be narrative; but a narrative from a book I have yet to read. I am comfortable with mystery; with my art work running years beyond my ability to 'understand' it.

 

In 2004 I drifted onto a secret, different path, a primal, wondering course for which no maps exists, a journey toward realities disturbing and thrilling as dreams.


Edward Hopper once said all he really wanted to do was paint light on the side of a house. Sometimes I wonder if all I want to do is paint the glowing curl of noxious green smoke against a transcendent apricot sky. Beautiful."




Aspens & Sunsets: Jerry Jordan & Tom Perkinson
Opening Friday, May 2, 5-730 at 123 W Palace Ave

 

Jerry Jordan paints colorful scenes of Southwestern landscapes with Native Americans reminiscent of the Taos Society of Artists painters. Jordan continues to draw inspiration from the Taos masters. His paintings are rich and vivid; seeming to capture not only beautiful images of Taos landscapes and pueblo life, but also the feeling of Taos itself. Using his mastery of color and strong brushwork to create incredible texture, Jordan breathes life into the images of his beloved land.  
At 17, while at a family gathering in Paris, Texas, Jordan wandered into the open door of a studio belonging to the artist W. R. Thrasher. Thrasher had paintings all over the studio, lined up and ready to be taken to market in Dallas where they would be sold.
“I can still smell it; the thinner, the paint,” reminisces Jordan. “Talk about inspired! I didn’t know it before, but I thought, 'This is what I want to do.'"
Jordan was so inspired that he asked Thrasher if he would consider taking him on as a student. When the artist refused his request, the determination that would prove invaluable later in Jordan’s career manifested and he began to write letters to Thrasher asking him to reconsider. Over a period of several months Jordan wrote 4 letters to Thrasher. Along with his 4th letter, Jordan also sent a small painting, sure this would change the artists mind once he laid eyes on it.  When there was still no response from Thrasher, Jordan wrote yet a fifth letter, this time admonishing Thrasher for his rudeness and demanding that at the very least, he return the painting.
It was this last letter that finally drew the artist’s attention and he invited Jordan to come and study with him, which he did. He spent two weeks with Thrasher the summer that he was 18 and three weeks the summer he was 19.
It was at the end of the summer in 1963, that Jordan first came to Taos. He fell in love with paintings by the early 20th-century Taos painters hanging on the walls of the lobby, dining room and hallways of the Kachina Lodge where his family stayed. It was through the filter of these paintings that he first saw the beauty of the Taos landscape. 
Tom Perkinson's work with watercolor and pastel captures the drama of light and shadow and the mystery that characterizes the geography of New Mexico. 
Perkinson was born in Indianapolis, Indiana. He was raised in the country, and developed a love for the natural landscape. He discovered that he had a talent for art while in elementary school. Art quickly became his passion. During high school he studied at John Herron Institute of Art in Indianapolis. After high school, he studied at the Chicago Academy of Art. 
He left Indiana to pursue an undergraduate degree at Oklahoma Baptist University in Shawnee, Oklahoma. Each year while attending university, he was invited to stage an annual exhibit of his work. His early work focused on the landscape, but also included still-lifes and city scenes. At that time, his favorite artists were the early painters of southern Indiana who painted the landscape in which he grew up; painters like T. C. Steele, Vawter, Schultze, and Forsythe. 
Upon graduation, he moved to New Mexico to pursue his Master's Degree in Fine Arts at the University of New Mexico. During his thesis studies, he focused on creating large-scale works that had a foundation in Surrealism, using detailed and highly rendered images. It was a critically important time in the artist's development, as his work matured and his commitment deepened. And, he continued to paint the landscape, which now reflected his new fascination with southwestern imagery. He found that the drama of light and shadow, and the mystery that characterizes the geography of New Mexico, held great appeal to him. He recognized that he had found an infinite source of inspiration in the panorama of the southwest landscape. His paintings reflect his skill and mastery of this challenging medium, watercolor. 
After receiving his Master's Degree in 1968, he taught art at the University of New Mexico for two years. In 1970, he committed his life to painting full time. His work is included in private and public collections across the globe, and he is represented in the collections of many museums, including the Museum of New Mexico, Santa Fe; the University Art Museum, Albuquerque; and the Eiteljorg Museum of Western Art in Indianapolis. 
Show will be on exhibit for two weeks.  The same evening is the West Palace Arts District’s First Friday Art Walk.  

 

Jerry Jordan paints colorful scenes of Southwestern landscapes with Native Americans reminiscent of the Taos Society of Artists painters. Jordan continues to draw inspiration from the Taos masters. His paintings are rich and vivid; seeming to capture not only beautiful images of Taos landscapes and pueblo life, but also the feeling of Taos itself. Using his mastery of color and strong brushwork to create incredible texture, Jordan breathes life into the images of his beloved land.  


At 17, while at a family gathering in Paris, Texas, Jordan wandered into the open door of a studio belonging to the artist W. R. Thrasher. Thrasher had paintings all over the studio, lined up and ready to be taken to market in Dallas where they would be sold.


“I can still smell it; the thinner, the paint,” reminisces Jordan. “Talk about inspired! I didn’t know it before, but I thought, 'This is what I want to do.'"


Jordan was so inspired that he asked Thrasher if he would consider taking him on as a student. When the artist refused his request, the determination that would prove invaluable later in Jordan’s career manifested and he began to write letters to Thrasher asking him to reconsider. Over a period of several months Jordan wrote 4 letters to Thrasher. Along with his 4th letter, Jordan also sent a small painting, sure this would change the artists mind once he laid eyes on it.  When there was still no response from Thrasher, Jordan wrote yet a fifth letter, this time admonishing Thrasher for his rudeness and demanding that at the very least, he return the painting.


It was this last letter that finally drew the artist’s attention and he invited Jordan to come and study with him, which he did. He spent two weeks with Thrasher the summer that he was 18 and three weeks the summer he was 19.


It was at the end of the summer in 1963, that Jordan first came to Taos. He fell in love with paintings by the early 20th-century Taos painters hanging on the walls of the lobby, dining room and hallways of the Kachina Lodge where his family stayed. It was through the filter of these paintings that he first saw the beauty of the Taos landscape. 


Tom Perkinson's work with watercolor and pastel captures the drama of light and shadow and the mystery that characterizes the geography of New Mexico. 


Perkinson was born in Indianapolis, Indiana. He was raised in the country, and developed a love for the natural landscape. He discovered that he had a talent for art while in elementary school. Art quickly became his passion. During high school he studied at John Herron Institute of Art in Indianapolis. After high school, he studied at the Chicago Academy of Art. 


He left Indiana to pursue an undergraduate degree at Oklahoma Baptist University in Shawnee, Oklahoma. Each year while attending university, he was invited to stage an annual exhibit of his work. His early work focused on the landscape, but also included still-lifes and city scenes. At that time, his favorite artists were the early painters of southern Indiana who painted the landscape in which he grew up; painters like T. C. Steele, Vawter, Schultze, and Forsythe. 


Upon graduation, he moved to New Mexico to pursue his Master's Degree in Fine Arts at the University of New Mexico. During his thesis studies, he focused on creating large-scale works that had a foundation in Surrealism, using detailed and highly rendered images. It was a critically important time in the artist's development, as his work matured and his commitment deepened. And, he continued to paint the landscape, which now reflected his new fascination with southwestern imagery. He found that the drama of light and shadow, and the mystery that characterizes the geography of New Mexico, held great appeal to him. He recognized that he had found an infinite source of inspiration in the panorama of the southwest landscape. His paintings reflect his skill and mastery of this challenging medium, watercolor. 


After receiving his Master's Degree in 1968, he taught art at the University of New Mexico for two years. In 1970, he committed his life to painting full time. His work is included in private and public collections across the globe, and he is represented in the collections of many museums, including the Museum of New Mexico, Santa Fe; the University Art Museum, Albuquerque; and the Eiteljorg Museum of Western Art in Indianapolis. 


Show will be on exhibit for two weeks.  The same evening is the West Palace Arts District’s First Friday Art Walk.  




Northern New Mexico Landscapes featuring Don Brackett
Opening Saturday, May 24, 5-730 at 225 Canyon Rd

 

Manitou Galleries is proud to present a group show of northern New Mexico landscape paintings featuring the work of Don Brackett. Also on display will be the art of Harry Greene, William Haskell, Jerry Jordan, and Billy Schenck.
Don Brackett is a third-generation New Mexican who has spent a lifetime documenting with paint the quiet, timeless villages and harsh, monumental landscapes of the sparsely populated state.
An Albuquerque native, Brackett's artistry was evident when he started drawing as early as age five. There were no artists in his family to model the artist's journey, so he forged his own path by studying art in high school and college, particularly life drawing and watercolor. He served with the U.S. Marines for three years in the Korean campaign, discovering a lifelong love of Hawaii while stationed there.
Brackett attended the University of New Mexico as a fine arts major and studied under painter Kenneth Adams, an associate of Taos Founders Andrew Dasburg and Walter Ufer, and the last member elected to the Taos Society of Artists – which put the art colony on the map around the turn of the 19th century.
Brackett initially painted in watercolors, receiving awards including the National Academy's distinguished Ford Times Award and Best of Show from the New Mexico Watercolor Society, where he met his wife, artist PJ Garoutte. He has been a longtime member of the American Watercolor Society.
In 1980, Brackett switched to oils, seduced by their juicy, textural quality. He became a member of the Society of American Impressionists and in 1992 won first place and $10,000 cash in the Best of the Sangres show in Pueblo, Colorado.
Brackett and Garoutte moved to Taos from Albuquerque in 1988 and have enjoyed a rare 35-year marriage and artistic partnership, influencing and challenging each other's work. For years, he and Garoutte painted on site in New Mexico, Colorado, Missouri and California in their van that allowed them to work while sheltered by he weather.
Brackett told Taos Magazine in 1999 that Garoutte has expanded his horizons with respect to color.
"When we began painting together he painted in blue and brown a lot. And he wore those colors too," said Garoutte.
Brackett admitted, "Its true. Blue jeans and a brown shirt. I was timid of color."
The couple painted in France, Italy, Mexico and Hawaii. For a year and a half the lived in a seaside cottage in Hawaii, Brackett started missing the Taos Mountains. Brackett credits the time in Hawaii with encouraging him to take more risks with composition and approach his work with a looser brush and sense of fun. He fully exploits the possibilities of oils, which he marries with Impressionism in rich, sometimes daringly thick brushstrokes.

Manitou Galleries is proud to present a group show of northern New Mexico landscape paintings featuring the work of Don Brackett. Also on display will be the art of Harry Greene, William Haskell, Jerry Jordan, and Billy Schenck.


Don Brackett is a third-generation New Mexican who has spent a lifetime documenting with paint the quiet, timeless villages and harsh, monumental landscapes of the sparsely populated state.


An Albuquerque native, Brackett's artistry was evident when he started drawing as early as age five. There were no artists in his family to model the artist's journey, so he forged his own path by studying art in high school and college, particularly life drawing and watercolor. He served with the U.S. Marines for three years in the Korean campaign, discovering a lifelong love of Hawaii while stationed there.

Brackett attended the University of New Mexico as a fine arts

Taos Founders Andrew Dasburg and Walter Ufer, and the last member elected to the Taos Society of Artists – 

 major and studied under painter Kenneth Adams, an associate ofwhich put the art colony on the map around the turn of the 19th century.


Brackett initially painted in watercolors, receiving awards including the National Academy's distinguished Ford Times Award and Best of Show from the New Mexico Watercolor Society, where he met his wife, artist PJ Garoutte. He has been a longtime member of the American Watercolor Society.


In 1980, Brackett switched to oils, seduced by their juicy, textural quality. He became a member of the Society of American Impressionists and in 1992 won first place and $10,000 cash in the Best of the Sangres show in Pueblo, Colorado.


Brackett and Garoutte moved to Taos from Albuquerque in 1988 and have enjoyed a rare 35-year marriage and artistic partnership, influencing and challenging each other's work. For years, he and Garoutte painted on site in New Mexico, Colorado, Missouri and California in their van that allowed them to work while sheltered by he weather.


Brackett told Taos Magazine in 1999 that Garoutte has expanded his horizons with respect to color.


"When we began painting together he painted in blue and brown a lot. And he wore those colors too," said Garoutte.
Brackett admitted, "Its true. Blue jeans and a brown shirt. I was timid of color."


The couple painted in France, Italy, Mexico and Hawaii. For a year and a half the lived in a seaside cottage in Hawaii, Brackett started missing the Taos Mountains. Brackett credits the time in Hawaii with encouraging him to take more risks with composition and approach his work with a looser brush and sense of fun. He fully exploits the possibilities of oils, which he marries with Impressionism in rich, sometimes daringly thick brushstrokes.




New Mexico Vision: Alvin Gill-Tapia, Arthur Lopez, & Miguel Martinez
Opening Friday, June 6, 5-730 at 123 W Palace

Gill-Tapia, Martinez, and Lopez – all native New Mexicans – are masters of bringing the spirit of New Mexico into contemporary vision. Each artist's work is iconic in its own right. Gill-Tapia's architectural renderings reduced to their essential forms, stand as stalwarts of Puebloan, Mission and Spanish Colonial heritage. Martinez' female figures, literally haloed, bespeak the divinity embodied in women. Lopez takes the Spanish santero tradition and contemporizes the subject matter, utilizing saints and religious themes to tell stories through flawless craftsmanship.

 

  




A New Look at the Old Southwest featuring Dennis Ziemienski
Opening Friday, June 27, 5-730 at 225 Canyon Rd

 

The Southwest has been intertwined with the world of art for hundreds of years. From the traditional pottery of Native Pueblos, to the Taos society of Artists, the landscape and culture of the region has inspired artists to birth exquisite creations. Nostalgia and history play an important part in the imagery of contemporary Southwestern artists, looking back and keeping alive the mythos of "The West".
A New Look at the Old Southwest is a group show presenting the top artists of the Southwest today, who invite us to take a peek into the past, through the lens of their artistic vision.
This show features new works by California-based painter Dennis Ziemienski. Dennis’ strong and richly colored images borrow much of their inspiration from early 20th century paintings and posters.  His early influences, J.C.Leyendecker, N.C.Wyeth, Ludwig Hohlwein and Tom Purvis, were all master designers in composition.  His background in illustration and poster design, with its simplified, sculpturally rendered images, gave Dennis the discipline and draftsmanship that give strength to his paintings today.
Traveling as frequently as he can, Dennis has found it to be a completely essential tool for developing different palettes, ideas and for tuning up sensibilities. “It is important for me to use a romantic sense of place and history, when required, to create a vision that lures the viewer into the picture; creating the desire to ‘be there’”.

 

The Southwest has been intertwined with the world of art for hundreds of years. From the traditional pottery of Native Pueblos, to the Taos society of Artists, the landscape and culture of the region has inspired artists to birth exquisite creations. Nostalgia and history play an important part in the imagery of contemporary Southwestern artists, looking back and keeping alive the mythos of "The West".


A New Look at the Old Southwest is a group show presenting the top artists of the Southwest today, who invite us to take a peek into the past, through the lens of their artistic vision.


This show features new works by California-based painter Dennis Ziemienski. Dennis’ strong and richly colored images borrow much of their inspiration from early 20th century paintings and posters.  His early influences, J.C.Leyendecker, N.C.Wyeth, Ludwig Hohlwein and Tom Purvis, were all master designers in composition.  His background in illustration and poster design, with its simplified, sculpturally rendered images, gave Dennis the discipline and draftsmanship that give strength to his paintings today.


Traveling as frequently as he can, Dennis has found it to be a completely essential tool for developing different palettes, ideas and for tuning up sensibilities. “It is important for me to use a romantic sense of place and history, when required, to create a vision that lures the viewer into the picture; creating the desire to ‘be there’”.



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